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slow shutter speed

This tag is associated with 4 posts

Slow Shutter Speed Inspirational Photos

Seriously… How amazing is it that you own a camera that you can adjust what shutter speed your on. To be able to create whatever moment you want is so incredible exciting! I tried to find inspirational photos of different ways one could find some creativity by slowing down their shutter speed. Each and everyone one of these photos inspire me! Be sure to take a moment and follow their link to view some of their other photography! This week we’re practicing using a slow shutter speed on Learn by Doing Photography!

Thanks for sharing!

AraKris

AraKris

Dangler

-dangler

FoxyPhoto2012

FoxyPhoto2012

HollyNorval

Holly Norval

Ian Lewis Photography

Ian Lewis Photography

HSundholm

H Sundholm (henriksundholm.com)

kjkmep

Kjkmep

Linh_rOm

Linh_rOm

NicholarGonzalesPhotography

Nicholas Gonzales Photography

NightSnapper

NightSnapper

SureshSrivathsan

Suresh Srivathsan

ScottB

Scott B~ (trying to catch up)

abiommacro2

Abiommacro2

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Learn by Doing – Slow shutter speed capturing light trails

Assignment #22 – Use a slow shutter speed to capture light trails from cars

I am super excited about how the pictures turned out. I have never tried to shoot light trails before so this was a first! First I had to get brave enough to climb over the rail and stand in the center of the street with my tripod. Once I was set up I felt safe, but as I walked to the center line I sure felt nerveous.

Here are some tips I learned on how to shoot light trails

1. Need a tripod for this one or at least something to set your camera on.

2. Use a remote or set your camera to self timer so you’re not touching the camera at all.

3. ISO at 100

4. I was in manual mode. For the first time I had too much light! So I set my aperture to 22 to let the least amount of light in. You can also shoot in Shutter Priority since it’s the shutter speed we are looking for.

5. Focus on something in the distance or the sky will work.

6. Your shutter speed depends on how dark it is. This picture above on the bridge was at 4 seconds anything longer was washed out with too much light. As the night got darker my shutter speed got longer. My longest shutter speed of the night was at 30 seconds.  So shutter speed depends on the light. Just set up on the tripod and try some different settings to see what you get.

7. Have fun! I thought it was great timing the cars trying to get the car lights coming and going at the same time. So there is a bit of patience on this one, but well worth it!

How to capture slow motion by slowing down your shutter speed

This week on Learn by Doing we are  slowing down our shutter speed in order to get some slow motion pictures. I just love pushing myself and learning more! Picking up your camera and using it all the time is the only way to go where you want to go with our camera.

This afternoon I was looking for some good tips on slowing down your shutter speed when I found this gem on YouTube by PhotoClassPro  If you want another great resource check out their website at  PhotoTips

 

Learn By Doing – Let’s slow it down now!

Assignment #15 – Slow shutter speed

Last week we froze motion by raising our shutter speed. Let me just say on record I love freezing water! Seeing those droplets reflecting the colors around. I love the fact you can manipulate the color of water droplet by either adding food coloring or using a colorful background. I think they’re beautiful! On to this week…

This week we are going to go the opposite direction. Time to slow down your shutter speed to give your water that beautiful flow. You will need a tripod for this or else something stable to rest your camera on since you will leaving the hand held zone.  If you have a remote use it if not just set the camera to timer and wait 2 seconds. If you don’t have a tripod be creative when looking for a stable object to set the camera on.

This picture was taken in Great Falls, MT using a shutter speed of 1/6 seconds. F/22 ISO 100 at sunset. First off let me tell you I didn’t take the picture this week, I took it last time I went to Great Falls. This is the first time since starting these assignments that I pulled out an old photo. I went down to the river this week in search of rapids but I must have picked the wrong spot on the wrong day  since there were no rapids and nothing really fitting that I wanted to take a picture of for the assignment. So I looked through my photos at home and found this one from a trip to Great Falls.

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 This week – Slow down motion… any water! Find a river or use a cup in your kitchen sink!