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Featured Photo

Featured Photo Wednesday – Francesco Medda

It’s photos like this one that I find truly amazing! Capturing life at an exact moment. If the shutter was clicked a moment sooner the children would be in the darkness a second longer and they would have been gone. The timing on the photograph is perfect photography! The contrast between the dark and the light just bring more attention to the subject. Thank-you Frank for sharing this photograph with us today.

FrankMed

This is one of my favorite photos. I do not know if it is technically correct, but I love it so. I love photography and I love the cinema. This scene reminds me of the old Italian movies in black & white

In particular a national film movement named Italian Neorealism (Italian: Neorealismo) characterized by stories set amongst the poor and the working class, filmed on location, frequently using non-professional actors. Italian Neorealist films mostly contend with the difficult economic and moral conditions of post-World War II Italy, representing changes in the Italian psyche and conditions of everyday life, including poverty, oppression, injustice and desperation.

Neorealism became famous globally in 1946 with Roberto Rossellini’s Rome, Open City, when it won the Grand Prize at the Cannes Film Festival as the first major film produced in Italy after the war. Major figures of Neorealism : Vittorio De Sica,Roberto Rossellini ,Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini.

Open City established several of the principles of neorealism, depicting clearly the struggle of normal Italian people to live from day to day under the extraordinary difficulties of the German occupation of Rome, consciously doing what they can to resist the occupation.

The children play a key role in this, and their presence at the end of the film is indicative of their role in neorealism as a whole: as observers of the difficulties of today who hold the key to the future

This photo was taken in an area of my city that has suffered heavy bombing during the World War II, and you can still see the effects.

www.flickr.com/francescomedda

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